How much is a billion

How Much Is a Billion
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      How Big Is A Million, Billion, Trillion, … ?

      This page attempts to answer the question in 3 ways:

Other Names for A Number
      Consider these examples. 2 thousand is 2,000 is 2 thousand = 2 x 103   2 million is 2,000,000 is 2 thousand thousands = 2 x 103 x 103 = 2 x 106   2 billion is 2,000,000,000 is 2 thousand, thousand, thousands = 2 x 103 x 103 x 103 = 2 x 109 or is 2 million thousands = 2 x 106 x 103 = is 2 x 109   2 trillion is 2,000,000,000,000 is 2 thousand thousand thousand thousand = 2 x 103 x 103 x 103 x 103 = 2 x 1012 or is 2 billion thousands = 2 x 109 x 103 = 2 x 1012 or is 2 million, millions is 2 x 106 x 106 = 2 x 1012   2 quadrillion is 2,000,000,000,000,000 is 2 thousand thousand thousand thousand thousand = 2 x 103 x 103 x 103 x 103 x 103 = 2 x 1015 or is 2 million million thousands = 2 x 106 106 x 103 = 2 x 1015 or is 2 million billions = 2 x 106 x 109 = 2 x 1015   2 quintillion is 2,000,000,000,000,000,000 is 2 thousand thousand thousand thousand thousand thousand = 2 x 103 x 103 x 103 x 103 x 103 x 103 = 2 x 1018 or is 2 trillion million is 2 million million millions is 2 billion billions = 2 x 1018
How Many Seconds Have You Lived
      Each day has 24 hours. Each hour has 60 minutes. Each minute has 60 seconds. Each day has 24 x 60 x 60 seconds or 86400 seconds.       Each year has 365.24 days. Each day has 86400 seconds. Each year has 31557600 seconds or about 3.2 x 107 seconds. 1 year is about 3.2 x 107 seconds 2 years is about 6.3 x 107 seconds 3 years is about 9.5 x 107 seconds 4 years is about 1.3 x 108 seconds 5 years is about 1.6 x 108 seconds 6 years is about 1.9 x 108 seconds 7 years is about 2.2 x 108 seconds 8 years is about 2.5 x 108 seconds 9 years is about 2.8 x 108 seconds 10 years is about 3.2 x 108 seconds 11 years is about 3.5 x 108 seconds 12 years is about 3.8 x 108 seconds 13 years is about 4.1 x 108 seconds 20 years is about 6.3 x 108 seconds 30 years is about 9.5 x 108 seconds 40 years is about 1.3 x 109 seconds 50 years is about 1.6 x 109 seconds 100 years is about 3.2 x 109 seconds 1,000 years is about 3.2 x 1010 seconds 1,000,000 years is about 3.2 x 1013 seconds 1,000,000,000 years is about 3.2 x 1016 seconds 1,000,000,000,000 years is about 3.2 x 1019 seconds
How Much Is a Billion     © May 20, 2005 , www.mathnstuff.com/math/spoken/here/2class/10/size.htm

How Many Millions in a Billion? Billions in a Trillion?

How Much Is a Billion

Have you ever daydreamed about winning the lottery and asked yourself, “How many millions are in a billion? How many billions are in a trillion?”

Whether you’re planning on coming in to a substantial fortune or just looking to master your ability to count zeroes, this article will explain the million to billion difference and give you charts to help you easily calculate.

How Many Millions in a Billion: Quick Answer

If you’re looking to go from million to billion, you’ll need to multiply by 1,000. In other words, there are 1,000 millions in a billion.

1,000,000 * 1,000 = 1,000,000,000

There are six zeroes in a million (or two groups of three zeroes). There are nine zeroes in a billion (or three groups of three zeroes).

How Many Billions in a Trillion: Quick Answer

Just as there are 1,000 millions in a billion, there are 1,000 billions in a trillion.

1,000,000,000 * 1,000 = 1,000,000,000,000

That’s a lot of zeroes! There are nine zeroes in a billion (or three groups of three zeroes). There are 12 zeroes in a trillion (or four groups of three zeroes).

How Many Millions in a Billion: Charts for Reference

These charts depict the degree of difference from one thousand to one million, one million to billion, one billion to trillion, and so on.

Thousand Million Billion Trillion Quadrillion Quintillion
Thousand 1 $10^3$ $10^6$ $10^9$ $10^12$ $10^15$
Million $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$ $10^6$ $10^9$ $10^12$
Billion $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$ $10^6$ $10^9$
Trillion $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$ $10^6$
Quadrillion $10^{-12}$ $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$
Quintillion $10^{-15}$ $10^{-12}$ $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1
Sextillion $10^{-18}$ $10^{-15}$ $10^{-12}$ $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$
Septillion $10^{-21}$ $10^{-18}$ $10^{-15}$ $10^{-12}$ $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$
Octillion $10^{-24}$ $10^{-21}$ $10^{-18}$ $10^{-15}$ $10^{-12}$ $10^{-9}$
Nonillion $10^{-27}$ $10^{-24}$ $10^{-21}$ $10^{-18}$ $10^{-15}$ $10^{-12}$
Decillion $10^{-30}$ $10^{-27}$ $10^{-24}$ $10^{-21}$ $10^{-18}$ $10^{-15}$
Sextillion Septillion Octillion Nonillion Decillion
Thousand $10^18$ $10^21$ $10^24$ $10^27$ $10^30$
Million $10^15$ $10^18$ $10^21$ $10^24$ $10^27$
Billion $10^12$ $10^15$ $10^18$ $10^21$ $10^24$
Trillion $10^9$ $10^12$ $10^15$ $10^18$ $10^21$
Quadrillion $10^6$ $10^9$ $10^12$ $10^15$ $10^18$
Quintillion $10^3$ $10^6$ $10^9$ $10^12$ $10^15$
Sextillion 1 $10^3$ $10^6$ $10^9$ $10^12$
Septillion $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$ $10^6$ $10^9$
Octillion $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$ $10^6$
Nonillion $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1 $10^3$
Decillion $10^{-12}$ $10^{-9}$ $10^{-6}$ $10^{-3}$ 1
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Million to Billion to Trillion: Comparison

When you’re dealing with numbers as big as one million, one billion, or one trillion, it can be hard to conceptualize exactly how big each number is. Let’s put them into more of a context:

One million is one thousand thousand. If you stacked one million pennies on top of each other, the tower would be about a mile high. If you divided one million dollars between everyone in the United States, each person would get about ⅓ of one cent.

One billion is one thousand millions. If you stacked one billion pennies on top of each other, the tower would be about 870 miles high. If you divided one billion dollars between everyone in the United States, each person would get about $3.33.

One trillion is one thousand billions. If you stacked one trillion pennies on top of each other, the tower would be about 870,000 miles high … which means it would reach to the moon and back and back to the moon again. If you divided one trillion dollars between everyone in the United States, each person would get about $3,000.

Let’s hope the world’s first trillionaire is a generous person!

What’s Next?

Want to brush up on any of your math topics ahead of the ACT? Check out our individual math guides to get the walk-through on each and every topic on the ACT Math test.

How Much Is A “Billion”?

How Much Is a Billion

In the recent economic troubles, we’ve grown used to hearing about millions, billions and even trillions of dollars, pounds, euros etc. It’s worth noting, however, that these words do not have a universally-agreed meaning. What one person means by billion can be very, very different from that assumed by another.

A thousand is always 1,000 and a million is always 1,000,000. After that things become less clear.

In the USA, the name given to 1,000,000,000 is a billion. However, in Britain and other places, this figure is sometimes referred to as “one thousand million” with a billion being 1000 times more : 1,000,000,000,000. The following table lists the meanings of the various words in the “American” and traditional “British” systems :

1,000,000,000
“American” 1 billion

“British” 1 thousand million

  • 1,000,000,000,000
    “American” 1 trillion
  • “British” 1 billion
  • 1,000,000,000,000,000
    “American: 1 quadrillion
  • “British 1 thousand billion
  • 1,000,000,000,000,000,000
    “American” 1 quintillion
  • “British” 1 trillion

And so forth. In fact, the “American” and “British” labels are misleading. As the OED notes, both systems were invented by the French. And both have their merits. The “American” system has the advantage of convenience.

It’s easier to say “one billion” than “one thousand million”. On the other hand, etymologically, there is something to be said for the “British” system. A billion is the second power of a million (a million times a million), a trillion is the third power and so forth.

This fits in with the bi- and tri- prefixes.

In Britain, people use both systems and this can and does cause confusion. It’s fair to say, however, that the “American” system is being used more and more and the “British” system less and less.

The UK government has been using the “American” standard since the 1970s. On the whole, the “American” approach is probably the better one to take as it’s what most people will understand.

But it may be worth spelling out exactly what you mean by these terms if you find yourself needing to use them.

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Keep learning! Browse the Vocabulary category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:

How Much is a Billion Dollars?

“…and a fact is the most stubborn thing in the world” — M. Bulgakov

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While Chaganty and Liang manually (and carefully) constructed their knowledge base from the United States Bureau of Statistics, we are going to take the lazy path and automate as much as we can to bootstrap our project: the bulk of our knowledge will come from the awesome free project known as DBPedia, which is basically a structured, machine-friendly version of Wikipedia.

In a few lines of Python we can parse DBPedia for numerical properties and use the triplestore to get an idea of the most frequent ones. As an illustration of the kind of facts we collected, some properties (with units) and examples are listed below:

runtime (seconds) -> Jurassic Park = 7620.0populationDensity (person/km^2) -> Durham (England) = 257tuition ($) -> University of Toronto School = 20875.0 careerPrizeMoney ($) -> Justine Henin = 2.0863335E7areaTotal (m^2) -> Normandin (Quebec) = 2.162E8

[ Our property selection is obviously just a stub: the non-lazy reader is encouraged to modify the pre-processing script to get even more interesting facts. ]

Once the knowledge base is completed and stored in a friendly format, it is time for our probabilistic magic: how much is indeed one billion?

Building the A.I. language generator

“Language is the source of (mis)understandings” — A. de Saint-Exupéry

Recall that the final goal of our model is to explain a target numerical expression using “more basic” facts to help us “put things in perspective”.

How many Is a billion?

In British English, a billion used to be equivalent to a million million (i.e. 1,000,000,000,000), while in American English it has always equated to a thousand million (i.e. 1,000,000,000). British English has now adopted the American figure, though, so that a billion equals a thousand million in both varieties of English.

The same sort of change has taken place with the meaning of trillion. In British English, a trillion used to mean a million million million (i.e. 1,000,000,000,000,000,000). Nowadays, it's generally held to be equivalent to a million million (1,000,000,000,000), as it is in American English.

The same evolution can be seen with quadrillion and quintillion.

In British English, a quadrillion used to mean a thousand raised to the power of eight (1024), and is now understood to be a thousand raised to the power of five (1015).

A quintillion, in British English, used to mean a million raised to the power of five (1030), and is now most commonly held to be a thousand raised to the power of six (1018).

Even higher are sextillion, septillion, octillion, nonillion, and decillion, some of which are not common enough to be included in OxfordDictionaries.com yet.

Other terms follow the same linguistic pattern (ending with -illion) but do not refer to precise numbers. These include jillion, zillion, squillion, gazillion, kazillion, bajillion, and bazillion. All of these words are used informally to refer to an extremely or indefinitely large number.

  • See other Vocabulary Questions.
  • Take a look at some differences between British and American English.
  • Or you may be interested in: What is the origin of the '@' sign?

See more from Common Vocabulary Questions

How much is a Billion Pounds?

A billion means: 1,000 million = 1,000,000,000.

In 2017

  • In dollars, a billion Pounds is the equivalent of $1,350,000,000
  • In Euros, a billion pounds is currently: €1,120,000,000

Examples of billion

  • In August 2017, UK public sector net debt was £1,773 billion equivalent to 88% of UK GDP
  • In 2015/16 the UK government is forecast to spend a total of £753 billion
    • Total Unemployment benefits are £4.9 bn
    • Pension spending is £105 bn
    • Health care spending is £147bn
  • 1 billion seconds is about 32 years

Weight of one billion pounds in Pound coins

  • A pound coin weighs 9.5g or 0.0095kg
  • One billion Pound coins would weigh 9,500,000 kg or 9500 metric tonnes.
  • A car, such as Volkswagon golf weighs 1,376kg.
  • So one billion pounds in Pound coins would weigh the equivalent of 6,904 cars.

Old British billion

In the UK, a billion used to mean 1 million, million or 1,000,000,000,000. However, this is no longer used in modern finance. The UK government stopped using the old British billion in 1974.

Related concepts

Trillion

  •  A trillion is 1,000,000,000,000; one million million; 1012 (current use in British and American English)
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Googol

Billion

See also billon, billion (disambiguation), and 1,000,000,000.

A billion is a number with two distinct definitions:

  • 1,000,000,000, i.e. one thousand million, or 109 (ten to the ninth power), as defined on the short scale. This is now the meaning in both British and American English.[1][2]
  • 1,000,000,000,000, i.e. one million million, or 1012 (ten to the twelfth power), as defined on the long scale. This is one thousand times larger than the short scale billion, and equivalent to the short scale trillion. This is the historic definition of a billion in British English.

American English adopted the short scale definition from the French.[3] The United Kingdom used the long scale billion until 1974, when the government officially switched to the short scale, but since the 1950s the short scale had already been increasingly used in technical writing and journalism; the long scale definition still enjoys some limited usage in the UK.[4]

Other countries use the word billion (or words cognate to it) to denote either the long scale or short scale billion. For details, see Long and short scales – Current usage.

Milliard, another term for one thousand million, is still found occasionally in English, and is very common in most other European languages.

[5][6] For example, Bulgarian, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Hebrew (Asia), Hungarian, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Ukrainian — use milliard (or a related word) for the short scale billion, and billion (or a related word) for the long scale billion. Thus for these languages billion is thousand times larger than the modern English billion. However, in Russian, while milliard (миллиард) is used for the short scale billion, trillion (триллион) is used for the long scale billion.

History

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word billion was formed in the 16th century (from million and the prefix bi-, “two”), meaning the second power of a million (1,000,0002 = 1012). This long scale definition was similarly applied to trillion, quadrillion and so on.

The words were originally French, and entered English around the end of the 17th century.

Later, French arithmeticians changed the words' meanings, adopting the short scale definition whereby three zeros rather than six were added at each step, so a billion came to denote a thousand million (109), a trillion (1012), and so on.

This new convention was adopted in the United States in the 19th century, but Britain retained the original long scale use. France, in turn, reverted to the long scale in 1948.[3]
In Britain, however, under the influence of American usage, the short scale came to be increasingly used.

In 1974, Prime Minister Harold Wilson confirmed that the government would use the word billion only in its short scale meaning (one thousand million).

In a written answer to Robin Maxwell-Hyslop MP, who asked whether official usage would conform to the traditional British meaning of a million million, Wilson stated: “No. The word 'billion' is now used internationally to mean 1,000 million and it would be confusing if British Ministers were to use it in any other sense. I accept that it could still be interpreted in this country as 1 million million and I shall ask my colleagues to ensure that, if they do use it, there should be no ambiguity as to its meaning.”[4]

See also

Look up billion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • Names of large numbers

References

  1. ^ “How many is a billion?”. oxforddictionaries.com.
  2. ^ Dent, Susie (28 October 2011). “How billions and trillions changed”. BBC News. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  3. ^ a b “billion, n.”. OED Online. Oxford University Press. Retrieved June 15, 2019.
  4. ^ a b Cracknell, Richard; Bolton, Paul (January 2009). Statistical literacy guide: What is a billion? And other units (PDF) (Report). House of Commons Library. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  5. ^ “Com s'escriuen els nombres? How to write the numbers?”. Serveis i recursos lingüístics. Idiomes a la UPC (in Catalan). Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
  6. ^ “Confusions amb el “billion” i el “trillion” anglesos”. ésAdir-El portal lingüístic de la Corporació Catalana de Mitjans Audiovisuals (in Catalan). Corporació Catalana de Mitjans Audiovisuals.

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