How to format a bulleted list (and more)

Although selecting numbered and bulleted lists is very simple using them properly in Help+Manual requires a little more information. Please see Numbered and bulleted lists for details.

How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)
How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)

Select to restart the numbering of the current item or list with a different number. You can also use this to reset the numbering of a list to begin at 1.
Select to modify the currently selected bullet or numbering style.
Select to reset the current bullet or numbering style to its default settings.

Displayed by selecting Customize in the Bulleted tab. Edits the properties for the bullets style selected in the main tab.

How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)

Number of levels in the list. This is not active for bulleted lists, which always only have one level.
Formatting and style for the current level. Bulleted lists always only have one level.
Selecting anything except Bullet here switches to a numbered list.
Select a different character to use for the bullet in the bulleted list. The selected character will be displayed in the preview box on the right.

Displayed by selecting Customize in the Numbered tab. Edits the properties for the numbered list style selected in the main tab.

How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)

Number of levels in the list. This is not active for ordinary lists, which always only have one level.
Formatting and style for the current level. Ordinary numbered lists always only have one level.
You can choose a variety of styles for your numbered list. Experiment!
The format of the number displayed in the list. The variable displays the list number and should not be deleted. Any other characters you enter will be added to the number. The result is displayed in the preview box on the right.
Only active for lower levels of outline numbered lists (see below).
Activates legal numbering style for outline numbered lists, with all the list numbers at the left margin (see below).
When this is selected the numbering of sub-levels in outline numbered lists always re-starts with 1 or the equivalent (see below).

Displayed by selecting Customize in the Outline Numbered tab. Edits the properties for the outline numbered list style selected in the main tab.

How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)

Number of levels in the outline numbered list style. You can change the number of levels by adjusting the Count: value.
Formatting and style for the current level. Select the level to modify by clicking in the Levels box.
You can choose a variety of styles for your numbered list. Experiment!
The format of the number displayed in the list. The variables , etc. (for  the levels) display the list numbers and should not be deleted. Any other characters you enter will be added to the number. The result is displayed in the preview box on the right.
Resets the starting number of the current level. Only active for lower levels of outline numbered lists.
Activates legal numbering style for outline numbered lists, with all the list numbers at the left margin. This setting must be set separately for each level of an outline numbered list!
How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)
When this is selected the numbering of sub-levels in outline numbered lists always re-starts with 1 or the equivalent. Otherwise the numbering continues from one sub-level to the next. Must be selected separately for each level of the outline numbered list.
How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)
  • See also:
  • Text Formatting and Styles
  • Numbered and bulleted lists

How to Punctuate Bulleted and Numbered Lists

26 February, 2020

Bulleted and numbered lists help you present your work clearly. You can use them to

  • help readers understand key information at a glance
  • show that several items belong to a single category
  • break up complex points.

The advantage of lists is that they jump out at readers. However, if lists contain typos or inconsistencies then those will jump out at readers too. So it’s crucial to format and punctuate lists correctly, or your entire document can look sloppy.

Check Bullet Punctuation and Capitalization Automatically Right From Microsoft Word

​You can check your lists faster and more easily by using PerfectIt, which is a Microsoft Word Add-in. You just click run and it checks your document (and it has a 14 day free trial, which you can download here).

How to Format a Bulleted List (and More)Figure 1: Format and punctuate lists correctly

In the rest of this article, the term ‘bulleted lists’ is used to refer to both bulleted and numbered lists because in most cases the rules governing these two styles of list are identical. 

One (Very) Common Mistake

In multi-author documents, inconsistencies in bullet punctuation are a constant concern. Authors often have their own preferred style of punctuation. For example, one author might prefer list items to end in semicolons, while another prefers full stops.

It’s challenging enough for each author to apply their own rules consistently. However, punctuation marks are small and can be difficult to spot. As a result, ensuring consistency between authors is even more challenging, so mistakes happen frequently.

The Right Way to Punctuate Lists

So, how should you punctuate bulleted lists? As with so many writing issues, the answer is ‘It depends’! There is no single right way to punctuate all lists. It can even be right to use semicolons and full stops in the same document, because different types of list can take different forms of punctuation.

If you’re trying to figure out how to punctuate a list, the best place to start is your style manual. Preferences vary from guide to guide. For example, the European Union’s English Style Guide suggests

  • a comma or no punctuation for lists that do not contain the main verb
  • a full stop after each sentence for lists that contain at least one item with multiple sentences
  • a semicolon otherwise.

On the other hand, the Australian Style Manual (Wiley, Sixth Edition) suggests no punctuation unless there is a full sentence (or multiple sentences), in which case there should be a full stop.

When you check your style guide, pay particular attention to the rules for using

  • lower-case letters or capitals at the start of each list item
  • punctuation after each list item
  • punctuation in the final list item (which may be different from that of the other items).

To give you a better idea, here are some examples.

APA Style 6th Edition Blog: Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists

by Timothy McAdoo

This is the fifth in a six-part series about lists. Today I’ll discuss bulleted lists, which are new to APA Style!

Bulleted Lists

As the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association notes (p. 63), creating a list sometimes “helps the reader understand the organization of key points.

” And although numbered lists are useful, in some cases the numbers may imply a chronology or ranking of importance that you don’t intend.

Thus, I’m happy to share that bulleted lists are now an official part of APA Style (pp. 64–65)!

Bulleted lists allow a writer to create a list that stands out from the text without the implied chronology or order of importance that a numbered list might convey.

Any symbol may be used for the bullets, although small circles or squares are typical software defaults.

Here again, when full sentences are used, the first words should be capitalized and appropriate end punctuation should be included.

●  Each child received one plush toy.●  Some toys were familiar to the children from their experiences in Experiment     1. In Experiment 1, all children could see but not touch the plush elephant.     Also in Experiment 1, half of the children could see but not touch the plush     kangaroo, whereas the other half of the children could both see and touch    the plush kangaroo.●  One toy, a plush giraffe, was unique to Experiment 2.

(Note that although we single-space examples in the blog, you should double-space lists in an APA Style manuscript just as you would regular text.)

Bulleted Lists Within Sentences

In the example above, I used full sentences. But, you can also use bulleted lists within a sentence. When you do so, capitalize and punctuate throughout the list just as you would in any sentence.

See also:  Writing for dyslexic readers

For example, in the following list, note the commas following the first two items, the conjunction “and” included with the second-to-last item, the lowercase used for each item in the list, and the end punctuation with the last item.

Each child was seated at a separate station and given●  an elephant,●  a kangaroo, and●  a giraffe.

And remember that the rule for semicolons when items have internal commas is still applicable:

Each child was seated at a separate station and given●  an elephant, which all children could see but not touch in Experiment 1;●  a kangaroo, which half of the children could see but not touch and half of the     children could both see and touch in Experiment 1; and●  a giraffe, which was new to all children in this experiment.

A Caveat

Bulleted lists

Bulleted lists are useful when you want to create a list that stands out from the text without implying a certain chronology or ordering of the items. Lists help the reader identify the key points in the text. However, cluttered and inconsistent bulleted lists can lead to the opposite result. Here you can read a few simple rules about how to create a neat and clear bulleted list.

Keep the items short

The items of a bulleted list must be short. Avoid bulleted items that are longer than two lines. If you need to have longer items, put them in the running text.

Bulleted items should not repeat parts of the introductory sentence. If you have bulleted items that start with the same words, consider including the words in the introductory sentence.

Keep the items parallel

The items of a bulleted list must be of the same type. If your list items are sentences, they must be all sentences. If they are phrases, they must be all phrases. If they are single words, they must be all single words.

The items of a bulleted list should be of the same size. If you use sentences, try to have them of approximately the same length (and not longer than two lines). If you are using phrases, try to have them contain approximately the same number of words.

The items of a bulleted list must begin with the same part of speech: nouns, verbs, etc. If you use verbs, make sure they are in the same tense.

Punctuation in bulleted lists

  • The introductory sentence must end with a colon (:).
  • If you have sentence items, each of them must begin with an uppercase letter and end with a full stop.
  • The plan for today’s meeting is as follows:
  • Executive director Marshall Blix will present the new marketing plan.
  • Financial adviser Chris Skinny will review the sales from the last 7 days.
  • Fireman Marta Collins will talk about workplace safety.

If your items are words or phrases that do not form a full sentence by themselves, style guides suggest that they begin with a lowercase letter and are punctuated as follows:

  • no punctuation after the first item
  • no punctuations after the second, third, etc., items
  • a full stop after the last item.

A more formal style (used in legal writings) is to use this punctuation:

  • a semicolon after each item but the last;
  • a full stop after the last item.

If your penultimate item ends with and or or, place a comma come before and or or.

My favorite colours are:

  • aquamarine blue
  • carmine red, and
  • cadmium yellow.

A bulleted list about common mistakes in bulleted lists:

  1. When creating a bulleted list, avoid:
  2. ☀ Fancy symbols for the bullets;
    ☀ Nested bulleted list. This creates:
  3. – clutter
    – confusion; and
    – nausea.
  4. ☀ Items beginning with:
  5. – the same word, or
    – the same phrase.
  6. ☀ inconsistent punctuation and formatting,
  7. ☀ Do not mix sentence items and phrase items in the same list.
  8. ☀ When creating a bulleted list, avoid repeating (parts of) the introductory sentence.
  9. ☀ Avoid
  10. ☀ Excessive
  11. ☀ Use
  12. ☀ Of
  13. ☀ Bullet
  14. ☀ Points.

Bulleted Lists

To draw visual attention to items in a list without implying that items go in a certain order (e.g., chronology, importance, priority), use a bulleted list.

Use a numbered list if you want to display items in a numbered series. Use a lettered list if you want to emphasize separate parallel items within a sentence.

To create a bulleted list, use the bulleted list function of your word-processing program. This will automatically indent the list as well. Symbols such as small circles, squares, dashes, and so forth may be used for the bullets.

Items That Are Complete Sentences

If bulleted items are complete sentences, begin each item with a capital letter and finish it with a period or other appropriate punctuation.

The following example demonstrates this format as well as how to include a citation for the information in the bulleted list.

Infants often display prosocial behavior—that is, behavior intended to help others—when interacting with their parents, as demonstrated in the following examples (Hammond & Drummond, 2019):

    • Infants are happy to participate in normal household chores, such as cleaning up.
    • Infants often display positive emotions when following parents’ behavioral requests, such as not touching the stove.

    7 Tips for Presenting Bulleted Lists in Digital Content

    Summary: Bullet points help break up large blocks of text, make complex articles and blog posts easier to grasp, and make key information stand out.

    Sometimes the best way to present information is in a bulleted list. Bulleted lists attract attention, support scanning, shorten text, and reveal the relationship of items.

    The Web is usually not the place for long, narrative writing. Instead, Web readers prefer copy formatted for ease of scanning, which allows them to easily skip through chunks of text to get to areas of interest.

    Many different web-formatting techniques help break up dense paragraphs. Along with bolding, indenting, line spacing, and color-coding, bulleted lists are one of the most powerful methods for supporting efficient reading on the web.

    A few tiny dots attract the eye and can make a complex concept understandable. Readers perceive the bullets as shortcuts to succinct, high-priority content. It’s not surprising that, in usability studies, we observe readers gravitate towards bulleted lists with fervor. Web readers want to digest content quickly.

    Compare the two different versions below. You’ll probably notice that the information listed in version 2 is easier to read. That’s because the offerings are clearly listed vertically on separate lines. In contrast, in version 1, the reader has to find them within the less structured text paragraph.

    Version 1

    • Our Spa getaway package includes two-night accommodation, two 50-minute spa treatments of your choice, an in-room breakfast for two, and gift basket upon arrival.
    • Version 2
    • Our Spa getaway package includes:
    • Two-night accommodation
    • Two 50-minute spa treatment of your choice
    • An in-room breakfast for two
    • Gift basket upon arrival

    Format a bulleted or numbered list in Word for Mac

    PowerPoint 2016 for Mac Word 2016 for Mac Word for Mac 2011 PowerPoint for Mac 2011 More… Less

    Word

    PowerPoint

    Do any of the following:

    Change the style, color, or font size of bullets

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Bullets  , and then click Define New Bullet.

    3. Do any of the following:

      To change the bullet toDo this
      Another preset style Click the style that you want.
      A custom style Click Bullet, and then click the bullet style that you want.
      Another color Click Font, and then in the Font color list, click the color that you want.
      Another size Click Font, and then in the Size list, enter the size that you want.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Change a bullet to a picture

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Bullets  , and then click Define New Bullet.

    3. Click Picture, click the picture that you want, and then click Insert.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Change the style, color, or font size of numbers

    1. Select the numbered list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Numbering  , and then click Define New Number Format.

    3. Do any of the following:

      To change the number toDo this
      Another preset style Under Number Format, in the Number style list, click the style that you want.
      Another color Click Font, and then in the Font color list, click the color that you want.
      Another font size Click Font, and then in the Size list, enter the size that you want.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Change the starting number in a numbered list

    1. Click anywhere in a numbered list.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Numbering  , and then click Define New Number Format.

    3. Under Number format, in the Start at box, enter the number that you want to start with.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Adjust the spacing between a bullet or number and text

    1. Select the list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Numbering  , and then click Define New Number Format.

    3. Under Text position, in the Indent at box, enter the value that you want.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Create a bulleted or numbered list

    Do any of the following:

    Change the style, color, or font size of bullets

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Bullets  , and then click Bullets and Numbering.

    3. Do any of the following:

      To change the bullet toDo this
      Another preset style Click the style that you want.
      A custom style or special character Click the button under Customize, and then click the bullet style that you want, or use the keyboard to enter any character you want in the box.
      Another color In the Color list, click the color that you want.
      Another size In the Size box, enter the size as a percentage.
      A picture Click Picture, click the picture that you want, and then click Insert. Note: You can not change the color of a picture bullet.

    Change the style, color, or font size of numbers

    1. Select the numbered list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Numbering  , and then click Bullets and Numbering.

    3. Do any of the following:

      To change the number toDo this
      Another preset style Click the style that you want.
      Another color In the Color list, click the color that you want.
      Another font size In the Size box, enter the size as a percentage.

    Change numbering in a numbered list

    1. Select the number that you want to change.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Numbering  , and then click Bullets and Numbering.

    3. In the Start at box, enter the number that you want to start with.

    Adjust the spacing between a bullet or number and text

    1. Select the list that you want to format.

    2. On the View tab, select the Ruler check box to show the ruler.

      The ruler displays the indent markers for the selected bullet.

    3. Note: Drag the upper half of the text indent marker to increase the space between the bullet and text. If you drag the lower half of the indent marker, the bullet indent marker and the text indent marker move together.

    Word

    PowerPoint

    Do any of the following:

    Change the style, color, or font size of bullets

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Bulleted List  , and then click Define New Bullet.

    3. Do any of the following:

    To change the bullet toDo this
    Another preset style Click the style that you want.
    A custom style Click Bullet, and then click the bullet style that you want.
    Another color Click Font, and then on the Font color pop-up menu, click the color that you want.
    Another size Click Font, and then in the Size box, enter the size that you want.

    Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Change a bullet to a picture

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Bulleted List  , and then click Define New Bullet.

    3. Click Picture, click the picture that you want, and then click Insert.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Change the style, color, or font size of numbers

    1. Select the numbered list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Numbered List  , and then click Define New Number Format.

    3. Do any of the following:

    To change the number toDo this
    Another preset style Under Number format, on the Number style pop-up menu, click the style that you want.
    Another color Click Font, and then on the Font color pop-up menu, click the color that you want.
    Another font size Click Font, and then in the Size box, enter the size that you want.

    Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Change the starting number in a numbered list

    1. Click anywhere in a numbered list.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Numbered List  , and then click Define New Number Format.

    3. Under Number format, in the Start at box, enter the number that you want to start with.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Adjust the spacing between a bullet or number and text

    1. Select the list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Numbered List  , and then click Define New Number Format.

    3. Under Text position, in the Indent at box, enter the value that you want.

      Tip: A preview shows the results of your adjustments so that you can experiment before you decide.

    Create a bulleted or numbered list

    Do any of the following:

    Change the style, color, or font size of bullets

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Bulleted List  , and then click Define New Bullet.

    3. Do any of the following:

    To change the bullet toDo this
    Another preset style Click the style that you want.
    A custom style On the Custom bullet pop-up menu, click the bullet style that you want.
    Another color On the Color pop-up menu, click the color that you want.
    Another size In the Size box, enter the size as a percentage.

    Change a bullet to a picture or special character

    1. Select the bulleted list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Bulleted List  , and then click Define New Bullet.

    3. On the Custom bullet pop-up menu, do one of the following:

    To change the bullet toDo this
    A picture Click Picture, click the picture that you want, and then click Insert. Note: You can not change the color of a picture bullet.
    A special character Click Character, click the character that you want, and then click Insert and then close the Characters dialog box.

    Change the style, color, or font size of numbers

    1. Select the numbered list that you want to format.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Numbered List  , and then click Numbering Options.

    3. Do any of the following:

    To change the number toDo this
    Another preset style Click the style that you want.
    Another color On the Color pop-up menu, click the color that you want.
    Another font size In the Size box, enter the size as a percentage.

    Change numbering in a numbered list

    1. Select the number that you want to change.

    2. On the Home tab, under Paragraph, click the arrow next to Numbered List  , and then click Numbering Options.

    3. In the Start at box, enter the number that you want to start with.

    Adjust the spacing between a bullet or number and text

    1. Select the list that you want to format.

    2. On the View menu, click Ruler.

      The ruler displays the indent markers for the selected bullet.

    3. Drag the text indent marker  , which is on the bottom of the ruler, to a new position.

      Note: Drag the upper half of the text indent marker to increase the space between the bullet and text. If you drag the lower half of the indent marker, the bullet indent marker and the text indent marker move together.

    How to Write Powerful Bullet Points

    Any writer who’s spent time in the trenches publishing articles online knows it’s hard to keep a reader’s attention. In fact, according to Tony Haile’s 2014 article on Time.

    com, 55 percent of readers will spend fifteen seconds or less actively on a page reading the article that took you many times longer to write and carefully proofread.

    Like it or not, our online culture, which blasts us with a never-ending stream of content 24/7, has made us skimmers rather than deep readers.

    Here’s a tip: Want to make sure your writing always looks great? Grammarly can save you from misspellings, grammatical and punctuation mistakes, and other writing issues on all your favorite websites.

    Your writing, at its best.

    Be the best writer in the office.

    Get Grammarly

    What’s a content creator to do? You could keep your content short, but there’s evidence that longer pieces get more social engagement and links.

    The key to writing articles that hold a reader’s attention is not to make them shorter but to make them more readable, and doing so requires expert organization that calls attention to key topics.

    There’s arguably no more useful organizational tool than the venerable bullet point.

    How to write powerful bullet points

    According to Copyblogger, “the essence of a great bullet is brevity + promise.” By using bullets, you’re demonstrating that you know how to be concise and cut to the chase. Then, you must deliver on that promise by making every point essential and impactful. Let’s demonstrate the power of bullet points with a list of tips for writing awesome ones:

    • Think of a bullet point as a mini headline. It needs to be concise and attention-grabbing in a way that intrigues readers and compels them to read more.
    • Highlight elements key to understanding the content of your article. There’s no room for fluff here, so call out what’s most important.
    • Keep it simple. Avoid complex outlines and don’t use sub-bullets if you can help it.
    • Keep bullets thematically related. Bullet points highlight key elements of very specific topics, so stay on a single track.
    • Make your bullet points symmetrical . . . just like the ones here. Notice how each point begins with a bolded directive and ends with a one-sentence explanation.
    • Work in keywords. Search engines tend to give bulleted lists a little more weight.
    • Don’t overdo it. You want your post to look like an article, not a grocery list.

    What is a fascination?

    A fascination is a copywriting technique for creating points that make your readers so intrigued (fascinated!) that they’re compelled to get more info. It’s a go-to marketing tactic you’ve no doubt seen in advertising. Let’s invent a make-believe product to show you how fascinations work.

    The Amazing Party Animal Personality Enhancer!

    Use this simple device during any social event and you’re virtually guaranteed to

    • develop killer dance moves
    • become the most entertaining person in the room
    • attract 180 percent more attention from potential love interests
    • increase your notoriety in your social circles by 83 percent

    Okay, so this “personality enhancer” sounds too good to be true (or suspiciously like your favorite party beverage), but the points are compelling. Who doesn’t want to become an entertaining, attractive, well-known dancing machine?

    The same technique can work well when you’re trying to get readers to spend more than fifteen seconds looking at your post. If it fits the tone of your article, frontload it with bulleted items that make compelling promises. You’re telling visitors that, if they take the time to read this article, they’ll get to know more about the fascinating topics you highlighted.

    Grammar basics of using bullet points

    Bullet points often create confusion for writers. Do you capitalize each one? Put periods at the end? When should you use numbers instead of bullets? It turns out that making your articles easy to read through the strategic use of bullet points requires a little know-how. Here are a few guidelines.

    The introductory sentence

    If the text introducing your list is a complete sentence, it should end with a colon. If it’s a fragment, forget the colon and jump straight into the list.

    • Numbers or bullets?
    • If your action items need to take place in a specific order, use a numbered list rather than bullets.
    • EXAMPLE:
    • Here’s how to give your dog a bath:
    • 1 Place a shower cap on your dog’s head.
    • 2 Give him his rubber ducky to provide emotional security.

    3 Gently bathe your dog. Avoid getting water in his big sad eyes.

    You could also use a numbered list if your introductory text promises a certain number of items, like the three best reasons to bathe your dog. (But do you really need reasons?)

    Punctuation with bullet points

    If the text of your bullet point is a complete sentence (or multiple sentences), use capital letters and punctuation. If your points are not structured as proper sentences, you don’t need to end with punctuation. Capitalization is a style choice—with sentence fragments, you can choose to start each with either upper- or lower-case letters.

    The structure to use with bullet points

    Don’t mix and match sentence structures. Your points should be consistent, either all sentences or all fragments.

    Make sure the grammatical structure of your bullet points is parallel by starting each with the same part of speech. For instance, if you start one point with an adjective, start them all with an adjective.

    CORRECT:

    Adopting a dog will make you

    • popular with dog lovers
    • famous for having the most adorable pet on your block

    INCORRECT:

    Adopting a dog will make you

    • popular with dog lovers
    • you’ll be famous for having the most adorable pet on your block
    1. Here’s a tip: Read each bullet point with the text that precedes it to make sure each one is parallel and makes sense as a sentence.
    2. Using the correct example above, you would read:
    3. “Adopting a dog will make you popular with dog lovers.”
    4. But the incorrect example makes no sense as a sentence, so you know you need to edit:
    5. “Adopting a dog will make you you’ll be famous for having the most adorable pet on your block.”

    Keep your style consistent

    Some of the bullet point style rules aren’t hard and fast.

    Unless you’re following a specific style guide (such as the AP Stylebook or The Chicago Manual of Style), use the style that looks best to you, but remember to keep it parallel and keep it consistent, because those things are non-negotiable.

    With a little precision, you’ll create bullet points that will catch your readers’ attention and keep them on the page so your carefully crafted words earn more than just fifteen seconds of their time.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*