Formatting hyperlinks

/en/word2016/lists/content/

Introduction

Adding hyperlinks to text can provide access to websites and email addresses directly from your document.

There are a few ways to insert a hyperlink into your document.

Depending on how you want the link to appear, you can use Word's automatic link formatting or convert text into a link.

  • Optional: Download our practice document.
  • Watch the video below to learn more about hyperlinks in Word.

Hyperlinks have two basic parts: the address (URL) of the webpage and the display text. For example, the address could be http://www.popsci.com, and the display text could be Popular Science Magazine. When you create a hyperlink in Word, you'll be able to choose both the address and the display text.

Word often recognizes email and web addresses as you type and will automatically format them as hyperlinks after you press Enter or the spacebar. In the image below, you can see a hyperlinked web address.

Formatting Hyperlinks

To follow a hyperlink in Word, hold the Ctrl key and click the hyperlink.

Formatting Hyperlinks

To format text with a hyperlink:

  1. Select the text you want to format as a hyperlink.Formatting Hyperlinks
  2. Select the Insert tab, then click the Hyperlink command.Formatting HyperlinksAlternatively, you can open the Insert Hyperlink dialog box by right-clicking the selected text and selecting Hyperlink… from the menu that appears.
  3. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box will appear.
  4. The selected text will appear in the Text to display: field at the top. You can change this text if you want.
  5. In the Address: field, type the address you want to link to, then click OK.Formatting Hyperlinks
  6. The text will then be formatted as a hyperlink.Formatting Hyperlinks

After you create a hyperlink, you should test it. If you've linked to a website, your web browser should automatically open and display the site. If it doesn't work, check the hyperlink address for misspellings.

Editing and removing hyperlinks

Once you've inserted a hyperlink, you can right-click the hyperlink to edit, open, copy, or remove it.

Formatting Hyperlinks

To remove a hyperlink, right-click the hyperlink and select Remove Hyperlink from the menu that appears.

Formatting Hyperlinks

Challenge!

  1. Open our practice document.
  2. Scroll to page 4.
  3. In the first bullet point under Community Reminders, format the word website as a hyperlink to http://www.epa.gov/recycle.
  4. Test your hyperlink to make sure it works.
  5. In the second bullet point, remove the hyperlink from the words Parks and Recreation.

Create or edit a hyperlink

Word for Microsoft 365 Outlook for Microsoft 365 Word 2019 Outlook 2019 Office 2016 Word 2016 Outlook 2016 Word 2013 Outlook 2013 Word 2010 Outlook 2010 Word 2007 Outlook 2007 PowerPoint 2007 Office 2007 Office 2010 Office 2013 Word Starter 2010 More… Less

The fastest way to create a basic hyperlink in an Office document is to press ENTER or the SPACEBAR after you type the address of an existing webpage, such as http://www.contoso.com. Office automatically converts the address into a link.

In addition to webpages, you can create links to existing or new files on your computer, to email addresses, and to specific locations in a document. You can also edit the address, display text, and font style or color of a hyperlink.

Notes: 

  • If you want to remove links or stop Office from automatically adding hyperlinks, see Remove or turn off hyperlinks.
  • This article applies to desktop versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint. A simplified set of hyperlink features is offered in Office Online. If you have a desktop version of Office, you can edit your document there for more advanced hyperlink features, or you can try or buy the latest version of Office.
  1. Select the text or picture that you want to display as a hyperlink.

  2. On the Insert tab, click Hyperlink.

    You can also right-click the text or picture and click Hyperlink on the shortcut menu.

  3. In the Insert Hyperlink box, type or paste your link in the Address box.

    Note: If you don't see the Address box, make sure Existing File or Web Page is selected under Link to.

    Optionally, type different display text for your link in the Text to display box.

    Note: If you don't know the address for your hyperlink, click Browse the Web to locate the URL on the Internet and copy it.

Optional: To customize the ScreenTip that appears when you rest the pointer over the hyperlink, click ScreenTip in the top-right corner of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box and enter the text you want.

You can add a hyperlink to a file on your computer, or to a new file that you want to create on your computer.

  1. Select the text or picture that you want to display as a hyperlink.

  2. On the Insert tab, click Hyperlink.

  3. Under Link to, do one of the following:

    • To link to an existing file, click Existing File or Web Page under Link to, and then find the file in the Look in list or the Current Folder list. Formatting Hyperlinks
    • To create a new, blank file and link to it, click Create New Document under Link to, type a name for the new file, and either use the location shown under Full path or browse to a different save location by clicking Change. You can also choose whether to Edit the new document later or open and Edit the new document now. Formatting Hyperlinks
See also:  The history of the rise of labor unions in america

Optional: To customize the ScreenTip that appears when you rest the pointer over the hyperlink, click ScreenTip in the top-right corner of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box and enter the text you want.

  1. Select the text or picture that you want to display as a hyperlink.

  2. On the Insert tab, click Hyperlink .

    You can also right-click the text or picture and click Hyperlink on the shortcut menu.

  3. Under Link to, click E-mail Address.

    Formatting Hyperlinks

  4. Either type the email address that you want in the E-mail address box, or select an address in the Recently used e-mail addresses list.

  5. In the Subject box, type the subject of the message.

    Note: Some web browsers and email programs might not recognize the subject line.

Optional: To customize the ScreenTip that appears when you rest the pointer over the hyperlink, click ScreenTip in the top-right corner of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box and enter the text you want.

You can also create a hyperlink to a blank email message by simply typing the address in the document. For example, type [email protected], and Office creates the hyperlink for you (unless you turned off automatic formatting of hyperlinks).

You can create hyperlinks that link to a Word document or Outlook email message that includes heading styles or bookmarks. You can also link to slides or custom shows in PowerPoint presentations and specific cells and sheets in Excel spreadsheets.

Tips: 

  • Learn about adding bookmarks.
  • To add a heading style, select your heading text, click the Home tab in Word or the Format Text tab in Outlook, and select a style in the Styles group.

Create a hyperlink to a location in the current document

  1. Select the text or picture that you want to display as a hyperlink.

  2. On the Insert tab, click Hyperlink .

    You can also right-click the text or picture and click Hyperlink on the shortcut menu.

  3. Under Link to, click Place in This Document.

    Formatting Hyperlinks

  4. In the list, select the heading (current document only), bookmark, slide, custom show, or cell reference that you want to link to.

Optional: To customize the ScreenTip that appears when you rest the pointer over the hyperlink, click ScreenTip in the top-right corner of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box and enter the text you want.

Create a hyperlink to a location in another document

  1. Select the text or picture that you want to display as a hyperlink.

  2. On the Insert tab, click Hyperlink .

    You can also right-click the text or picture and click Hyperlink on the shortcut menu.

  3. Under Link to, click Existing File or Web Page.

  4. In the Look in box, click the down arrow, and find and select the file that you want to link to.

  5. Click Bookmark, select the heading, bookmark, slide, custom show, or cell reference that you want, and then click OK.

Optional: To customize the ScreenTip that appears when you rest the pointer over the hyperlink, click ScreenTip in the top-right corner of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box and enter the text you want.

  • To change the address or display text of a hyperlink you added, right-click the link and click Edit Hyperlink.
  • To change the appearance of a hyperlink, such as font style, size, or color, right-click the link and click Font on the shortcut menu, or click a style option on the mini toolbar that appears.
  • To customize the ScreenTip that appears when you rest the pointer over the hyperlink, right-click the link, click Edit Hyperlink, click ScreenTip in the top-right corner of the dialog box, and enter the text you want.
  • Remove or turn off hyperlinks
  • Create a hyperlink in Publisher
  • Create a hyperlink in OneNote
  • Hyperlinks in Word for the web

Hyperlink Formatting

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Word 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Word, click here: Hyperlink Formatting.

by Allen Wyatt (last updated April 25, 2015)

By default, Word recognizes network and hyperlink addresses and formats them much as you would see them appear on a Web page. Normally, this means that the text shows up as blue and underlined.

Word provides the ability for you to change the way in which hyperlinks are formatted throughout your document.

This is because default formatting for hyperlinks is done using a defined character style.

To change the formatting of your hyperlinks, follow these steps:

  1. Display the Styles task pane by displaying the Home tab of the ribbon and then clicking the small icon at the lower-right corner of the Styles group.
  2. Click Options at the bottom of the Styles task pane. Word displays the Style Pane Options dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Formatting Hyperlinks

    Figure 1. The Style Pane Options dialog box.

  4. Using the Select Styles to Show drop-down list, select All Styles.
  5. Click OK to close the Style Pane Options dialog box.
  6. In the list of styles, hover the mouse pointer over the Hyperlink style. You should see a drop-down arrow appear at the right side of the style name.
  7. Click on the drop-down arrow and choose Modify. Word displays the Modify Style dialog box. (See Figure 2.)
  8. Formatting Hyperlinks

    Figure 2. The Modify Style dialog box.

  9. Click on the Format button and choose Font from the resulting drop-down list. Word displays the Font dialog box. (See Figure 3.)
  10. Formatting Hyperlinks

    Figure 3. The Font dialog box.

  11. Modify the font settings for your hyperlinks, as desired.
  12. Click on OK to close the Font dialog box. The Modify Style dialog box is still visible.

How to Change Color of Hyperlinks in Word

Formatting Hyperlinks

If you don’t like the way hyperlinks look in your Microsoft Word 2019, 2016, or 2013 document, you can change the color of both visited or non-visited hyperlinks using these steps.

Microsoft Windows

Non-Visited Hyperlinks

To change the color of hyperlinks that have not been visited or clicked, follow these instructions:

  1. Add the hyperlink to your document.
  2. From the “Home” tab, click the small arrow icon in the lower-right corner of the “Styles” box. Alternately, you can use Alt+Ctrl+Shift+S .
  3. In the “Styles” menu, hover your mouse pointer over “Hyperlink“, and then click the triangle that appears to the right. From the drop-down menu that appears, select “Modify…“.
  4. In the “Formatting” section, choose the color you want to use, then click “OK“.

Visited Hyperlinks

To change the color of hyperlinks that have been visited or clicked, follow these instructions:

  1. From the “Home” tab, select the small arrow icon in the lower-right corner of the “Styles” box. Alternately, you can use Alt+Ctrl+Shift+S .
  2. Select the “Options…” link in the lower-right corner.
  3. In the “Select styles to show:” drop-down menu, select “All styles“, then select “OK“. You will now have an option for “FollowedHyperlink” in the “Styles” list.
  4. In the “Styles” menu, hover your mouse pointer over “FollowedHyperlink”, and then click the triangle that appears to the right. From the drop-down menu that appears, select “Modify…“.
  5. In the “Formatting” section, choose the color you want to use, then click “OK“.

macOS

  1. From the “Home” tab, select “Styles Pane“.
  2. At the bottom-left corner in the “List” box, select “All Styles“.
  3. Select “Hyperlink” in the “Apply a style” area.

  4. In the “Current Style” area, select “Hyperlink“, then choose “Modify Style“.
  5. Select the color you wish to use for hyperlinks.
  6. You can perform the same steps for “FollowedHyperlink” if desired.

You have successfully changed the color of hyperlinks in your Word document.

Formatting Hyperlinks

If for some reason, in the AutoFormat submenu of the Format menu, you have unchecked the While Typing item, a URL you enter in a Writer document, directly or by copying and pasting from your browser, is not clickable. To make it clickable, follow these steps:

  • Select the hyperlink.
  • Go to the Format menu, then to the AutoFormat submenu and click on the Apply item.

The text of the hyperlink is now blue and underlined. The URL is clickable.

[edit] Formatting Hyperlinks in Calc

When you directly enter a URL in a cell of a spreadsheet, it is automatically replaced with a clickable hyperlink. But if you copy/paste such a URL, it is pasted in the default text format. It has been reported that if you add “by hand” a space at the end of the URL, the hyperlink turns clickable. However, if you have many URLs in a same column, the following method is faster.

Let's suppose that the range A1:A100 contains URLs which are not clickable.

  • Select a cell in an empty column, for instance B1
  • Click on the Function Wizard icon, on the left of the formula bar
  • In the Category drop-down menu, choose Spreadsheet, then HYPERLINK
  • Click on Next >>
    • In the URL field, enter A1, or click in the cell A1
    • In the CellText field, enter A1, or click in the cell A1
    • Click OK

    The link which appears in B1 is clickable.

  • Fill the column B, from B1 to B100, by clicking on the little black square in the right bottom of the cell B1, then dragging the cursor to cell B100. See Selecting and Filling a Cell Range in NeoWiki.

The link text is black. You can change the color following this way :

  • Select the cells, then choose the Cells… in the Format menu
  • In the Format Cells window, click on the Font Effects
  • In the Font Color drop-down menu, choose the color you desire (generally blue)

Don't delete the column A, but hide it: select it and go to the Format menu, then to the Column submenu. Select Hide.
This article in other languages: Français Español

Formatting Text and Hyperlinks – Infragistics Windows Forms™ Help

FormattedLinkEditor can display formatted text and hyperlinks in any Ultimate UI for Windows Forms control that supports embeddable editors. This includes the WinFormattedLinkLabel™, WinFormattedTextEditor™, as well the WinTooltipManager™, and the tooltips available for WinToolbarsManager™ tools can display formatted text and hyperlinks.

The following is an example of FormattedLinkEditor displaying multiple links as well as non-link text.

Click abc or xyz.

In this example, the “Click”, “or” and “.” are non-link texts. The “abc” and “xyz” are link texts. These two links can point to different URLs. Also, different portions of text can have different formatting (e.g. font, bold, italics, and color). The formatting for the WinFormattedLinkLabel is done by setting the Value property.

The WinToolbarsManager tools tooltip can by formatted by setting the ToolTipTextFormatted property off each tool’s SharedProps object, and setting the ToolTipDisplayStyle to Formatted of the WinToolbarsManager.

For the WinTooltipManager you have to set the ToolTipTextStyle to Formatted, and then you can specify formatting by setting the ToolTipText property.

HTML Links

Links are found in nearly all web pages. Links allow users to click their way from page to page.

HTML Links – Hyperlinks

  • HTML links are hyperlinks.
  • You can click on a link and jump to another document.
  • When you move the mouse over a link, the mouse arrow will turn into a little hand.

Note: A link does not have to be text. It can be an image or any other HTML element.

HTML Links – Syntax

Hyperlinks are defined with the HTML tag:

link text

Visit our HTML tutorial

Try it Yourself »

The href attribute specifies the destination address (https://www.w3schools.com/html/) of the link.

The link text is the visible part (Visit our HTML tutorial).

Clicking on the link text will send you to the specified address.

Note: Without a forward slash at the end of subfolder addresses, you might generate two requests to the server. Many servers will automatically add a forward slash to the end of the address, and then create a new request.

Local Links

The example above used an absolute URL (a full web address).

A local link (link to the same web site) is specified with a relative URL (without https://www….).

HTML Images

Try it Yourself »

HTML Links – The target Attribute

The target attribute specifies where to open the linked document.

The target attribute can have one of the following values:

  • _blank – Opens the linked document in a new window or tab
  • _self – Opens the linked document in the same window/tab as it was clicked (this is default)
  • _parent – Opens the linked document in the parent frame
  • _top – Opens the linked document in the full body of the window
  • framename – Opens the linked document in a named frame

This example will open the linked document in a new browser window/tab:

Visit W3Schools!

Try it Yourself »

Tip:

Formatting Hyperlinks

Grammar Girl here.

Today I'm going to talk about how to format Web addresses for print documents and websites.

URLs and Terminal Punctuation

A listener named Aileen recently asked how to deal with a Web address at the end of a sentence. Should she put the period or other terminal punctuation mark at the end of the sentence as she normally would, leave the period off so the reader doesn't mistakenly include it in the address, or do something funky such as put quotes around the Web address? 

Most of my books don't cover URL formatting, but The Chicago Manual of Style, which is probably the most comprehensive guide when it comes to formatting, says Web addresses don't need special treatment. So put the punctuation in just as you would if the sentence ended with a word or a number. [At least one online style guide agrees (1).]

Full URLs Versus Abbreviated URLs

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*