Word families

Advertisement.

EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.

Click here to learn more.

Word Families

(Already a member? Click here.)

Our subscribers' grade-level estimate for this page: 1st – 2nd
Match Rhyming WordsDolch WordsBlends EnchantedLearning.comWord Families

Word families are groups of words that have a common feature or pattern – they have some of the same combinations of letters in them and a similar sound. For example, at, cat, hat, and fat are a family of words with the “at” sound and letter combination in common.

The 37 most common word families in English (according to Wylie and Durrell) are: ack, ain, ake, ale, all, ame, an, ank, ap, ash, at, ate, aw ay, eat, ell, est, ice, ick, ide, ight, ill, in, ine, ing, ink, ip, it, ock, oke, op, ore, ot, uck ,ug, ump, unk.

Many of the nursery rhymes contain common word families. You can use these rhymes to teach these letter combinations (and how they are spelled and spoken), having the students sound them out after memorizing the rhyme. You can study one word family a week. Students can use the Little Explorers Picture Dictionary to look for more words that belong to word families.

The following is a list of the most common word families in English (from Wylie and Durrell, 1970, plus a few extra word families) and examples of each.

Word Families

ack
attack
back
black
crack
hack
Jack
knack
lack
pack
quack
rack
sack
snack
stack
tack
track
whack
Zack
ad
ad
bad
brad
cad
clad
dad
doodad
glad
had
lad
mad
pad
sad
age
age
cage
engage
rage
sage
stage
wage
ail
ail
fail
hail
jail
mail
nail
pail
rail
sail
snail
tail
wail
ain
brain
chain
complain
explain
gain
grain
main
obtain
pain
plain
rain
slain
Spain
sprain
stain
strain
train
vain
ake
awake
bake
brake
cake
fake
flake
Jake
lake
make
quake
rake
sake
shake
snake
stake
take
wake
ale
ale
bale
dale
gale
kale
male
pale
sale
scale
stale
tale
whale
all
all
ball
call
fall
gall
hall
install
mall
small
squall
stall
tall
thrall
wall
am
cam
clam
dam
dram
exam
gram
ham
jam
lam
ma'am
Pam
ram
Sam
scam
slam
spam
swam
tam
tram
wham
yam
ame
blame
came
fame
flame
frame
game
lame
name
same
shame
tame
an
an
ban
bran
can
clan
Dan
fan
flan
Fran
Jan
Japan
man
pan
pecan
plan
ran
scan
span
Stan
tan
than
van
ank
bank
blank
crank
dank
drank
flank
frank
Hank
plank
prank
rank
sank
shrank
spank
tank
thank
yank
ap
cap
clap
flap
gap
lap
map
nap
rap
sap
scrap
slap
snap
strap
tap
trap
wrap
yap
zap
ar
afar
bar
car
czar
far
gar
guitar
jar
mar
par
scar
spar
star
tar
tsar
ash
ash
bash
brash
cash
clash
crash
dash
flash
gash
gnash
hash
lash
mash
rash
sash
slash
smash
splash
stash
thrash
trash
at
at
bat
brat
cat
chat
fat
flat
gnat
hat
mat
pat
rat
sat
slat
spat
tat
that
vat
ate
abate
ate
crate
date
debate
fate
gate
grate
hate
Kate
late
mate
plate
rate
relate
sate
skate
state
aw
caw
claw
draw
flaw
gnaw
jaw
law
paw
raw
saw
slaw
straw
thaw
ay
away
bay
bray
clay
day
decay
delay
display
flay
gay
gray
hay
jay
lay
may
nay
okay
pay
play
pray
quay
ray
relay
replay
say
slay
spray
stay
stray
sway
they
today
tray
way
eat
beat
cheat
cleat
eat
feat
greet
heat
meat
neat
peat
pleat
seat
treat
wheat
eel
eel
feel
heel
keel
kneel
peel
reel
steel
wheel
eep
beep
creep
deep
jeep
keep
peep
seep
sheep
sleep
steep
sweep
weep
eet
beet
feet
fleet
greet
meet
sheet
sleet
street
sweet
tweet
ell
bell
cell
dell
dwell
farewell
fell
hell
sell
shell
smell
spell
swell
tell
well
yell
en
amen
Ben
children
den
fen
gentlemen
glen
Gwen
hen
men
open
pen
then
ten
when
wren
yen
ent
accent
bent
cent
dent
event
gent
lent
rent
scent
sent
spent
tent
vent
went
est
best
chest
crest
jest
nest
pest
quest
rest
test
unrest
vest
west
zest
ice
dice
ice
mice
nice
price
rice
slice
spice
splice
thrice
twice
vice
ick
brick
chick
click
flick
kick
lick
nick
pick
quick
Rick
sick
slick
stick
thick
tick
trick
wick
ide
bride
decide
glide
hide
pride
ride
side
slide
stride
tide
wide
ife
fife
knife
life
strife
wife
ight
bright
delight
fight
flight
fright
height
knight
light
might
night
plight
right
sight
slight
tight
tonight
ile
bile
file
mile
Nile
pile
rile
smile
stile
tile
vile
while
ill
bill
chill
dill
drill
fill
frill
gill
grill
hill
ill
Jill
kill
krill
mill
pill
quill
shrill
sill
skill
spill
still
swill
thrill
thrill
till
trill
will
in
bin
chin
din
fin
gin
grin
in
kin
pin
shin
skin
sin
spin
thin
tin
twin
win
within
ine
brine
decline
define
dine
fine
line
mine
nine
pine
shine
shrine
sine
spine
swine
tine
twine
vine
whine
wine
ing
bring
cling
fling
king
ping
ring
sing
sling
spring
sting
string
swing
thing
wing
wring
zing
ink
blink
brink
drink
fink
ink
link
mink
pink
rink
shrink
sink
stink
think
wink
ip
blip
chip
dip
drip
flip
grip
hip
lip
nip
quip
rip
ship
sip
skip
slip
snip
strip
tip
trip
whip
zip
it
admit
bit
fit
flit
grit
hit
it
kit
knit
lit
mit
pit
quit
sit
skit
slit
snit
spit
split
twit
wit
oat
boat
coat
float
gloat
goat
oat
stoat
throat
ock
block
clock
cock
crock
dock
flock
frock
hock
jock
knock
lock
mock
o'clock
rock
shock
smock
sock
stock
og
blog
bog
catalog
clog
cog
dog
fog
frog
hog
jog
log
slog
smog
oil
boil
broil
coil
foil
oil
soil
spoil
toil
oke
awoke
bloke
broke
choke
joke
poke
smoke
spoke
stoke
stroke
woke
yoke
oo
boo
coo
goo
igloo
moo
shoo
too
woo
zoo
ood
good
hood
stood
wood
ood
brood
food
mood
oof
goof
proof
roof
spoof
oof
hoof
woof
ook
book
brook
cook
crook
hook
look
nook
rook
shook
took
oom
bloom
boom
broom
doom
gloom
groom
loom
room
zoom
ool
cool
drool
fool
pool
spool
stool
tool
oon
balloon
goon
loon
moon
noon
soon
spoon
swoon
oop
coop
droop
hoop
loop
scoop
snoop
stoop
troop
oot (long oo)
boot
hoot
scoot
shoot
oot (short oo)
foot
soot
op
bop
chop
cop
crop
drop
flop
hop
lop
mop
plop
pop
prop
sop
shop
stop
top
ore
bore
chore
core
fore
gore
lore
more
ore
pore
score
shore
sore
spore
store
swore
tore
wore
yore
orn
adorn
born
corn
forlorn
horn
morn
scorn
shorn
thorn
torn
worn
ot
apricot
blot
bot
clot
cot
dot
forgot
got
hot
jot
knot
lot
not
plot
pot
rot
shot
slot
spot
tot
trot
ought
bought
brought
fought
ought
sought
thought
wrought
ould
could
should
would
ouse
douse
grouse
house
louse
mouse
spouse
out
about
bout
clout
gout
grout
out
lout
pout
scout
shout
snout
spout
stout
tout
trout
ow (rhymes with cow)
bow
cow
chow
how
now
plow
sow
vow
wow
ow (rhymes with low)
bow
blow
crow
flow
glow
grow
low
mow
row
show
slow
snow
sow
stow
throw
tow
own
brown
crown
down
drown
frown
gown
nightgown
town
uck
buck
chuck
cluck
duck
luck
muck
puck
pluck
stuck
struck
truck
tuck
yuck
ug
bug
dug
hug
jug
lug
mug
plug
pug
rug
shrug
smug
snug
thug
tug
ump
bump
clump
dump
grump
hump
jump
lump
plump
pump
rump
slump
stump
thump
trump
un
bun
fun
gun
nun
pun
run
shun
spun
stun
sun
unk
bunk
chunk
drunk
dunk
flunk
funk
hunk
junk
lunk
plunk
punk
skunk
slunk
spunk
sunk
trunk
See also:  How to get started blogging

Books to Print About Word Families

Word FamiliesWords that Rhyme with AdA Printable Mini BookA tiny, printable book about simple words rhyming with 'ad' — for early readers and writers. The book has 2 pages to print and makes 8 pages for the student to cut out, color, and write in. The words are: dad, glad, lad, mad, pad, sad, and “Can you think of another word that rhymes with ad?” Word FamiliesWords that Rhyme with AilA Printable Mini BookA tiny, printable book about simple words rhyming with 'ail' — for early readers and writers. The book has 2 pages to print and makes 8 pages for the student to cut out, color, and write in. The words are: mail, nail, pail, quail, snail, tail, and “Can you think of another word that rhymes with ail?” Word FamiliesWords that Rhyme with AkeA Printable Mini BookA tiny, printable book about simple words rhyming with 'ake' — for early readers and writers. The book has 2 pages to print and makes 8 pages for the student to cut out, color, and write in. The words are: bake, cake, flake, lake, snake, rake, and “Can you think of another word that rhymes with ake?” Word FamiliesWords that Rhyme with AllA Printable Mini BookA tiny, printable book about simple words rhyming with 'all' — for early readers and writers. The book has 2 pages to print and makes 8 pages for the student to cut out, color, and write in. The words are: ball, call, fall, hall, small, tall, and “Can you think of another word that rhymes with all?”
Word Families“AN” Words Book

What are word families?

Word families are groups of words that have a common feature, pattern or meaning. They usually share a common base or root word, to which different prefixes and suffixes are added.

In KS2 children will learn about root words, prefixes and suffixes.

For example, the root word happy might have a prefix added (unhappy) or might have a suffix added (happiness).Word FamiliesThe words happy, unhappy, happiness could be considered to belong to the same word family.

Word Families

When do children learn about word families?

  • It is important that children in KS2 understand the concept of root words, prefixes and suffixes, as this will come up in the Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling test they sit in Year 6.
  • Understanding word families is also very useful when children are learning about correct spelling, as being able to identify the root word will help them spell other words in the same word family.
  • According to the national curriculum children are introduced to word families in Year 3, when they are shown that common words are related in form and meaning (for example, the words solve, solution, solvent, dissolve and insoluble all belong to the same word family).Word FamiliesIn the Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling test children may be asked:
  • to match various prefixes with their correct root words
  • be given several words from the same family and asked to say what the root word means (sign, signature, design; the root word 'sign', from the Latin signum, means to make a mark for the purposes of authorisation)
  • to add a suffix to a noun to turn it into an adjective (for example: adding the suffix -ful to 'beauty' changes the word to make 'beautiful')

You can help your child at home by encouraging them to learn the spelling lists they are given at school. 

It would also be helpful to see if you can find words made up of prefixes / root words / suffixes and discuss with your child what the root word might mean. Can they think of any other prefixes or suffixes they could add to the word?

They may be tested on these in the KS2 SATs Grammar, punctuation and spelling test at the end of Year 6.

Study Word Families to Boost Your Vocabulary

site search by freefind advanced

Recognizing word families can multiply your word power! So what are they? “Word
families” can mean several types of word groups. Here we're talking about words made from the same root by adding different
suffixes or negative prefixes. 

Adding other prefixes to roots makes bigger changes in meaning. The words are still related, but not quite as closely. For example, to counteract means to act against something, and to react is to act in response to something.  

The adjective 'inactive' means not active. 'Hyperactive' or 'overactive' both mean more active than normal. 'Interactive' describes action between people. It's also used for ways people can interact with computers beyond reading the screen. 

The lists below give examples of the word family 'act' (showing the part of speech of each family member.) Then it explains related families made by adding a prefix to 'act,' showing only their most common words. (Parts of speech are the same as for words of the same suffix in the first list.)

Word Families

  • Verbs-    Nouns-   Adjs (or Advs)
  • act-          act, actor  —
  • —             action –  actionable
  • —              —            active, actively 
  • activate- activation activated
  • —             activity   —
  • —             activism, activist   —
  • —             inaction-  inactive
  • —              inactivity —

Related families (from the same root as 'Act')

  • counteract, counteractive
  • hyperactive,
    hyperactivity

  • interact,
    interaction, interactive, interactively, interactivity
  • react,
    reaction, reactivate, reactivation, reactive, reactivity

Definitions and Examples

To act is to do something. We say, “Actionsspeak louder than words.”

To activate

Word Families

Nouns and adverbs and verbs, oh my!

Parts of speech are the building blocks for English sentences, and studying them early on can be beneficial for English language learners. Along with common sentence patterns, learning the parts of speech (nouns, verbs, prepositions, etc.) can help students form English sentences more easily.

See also:  What is a bar graph?

But how do students know which vocabulary words are nouns, verbs, etc.? This is where suffixes (word endings) come into play. Learning common word endings can help students easily guess at the part of speech of a new vocabulary term.

Parts of speech and suffixes aren’t just for beginner students.

This knowledge can boost students’ abilities in both grammar and vocabulary at any level, and is quite useful for higher‑level students who need to decipher complex and unfamiliar words.

Learning and practicing word families in context can help higher-level students with speaking and writing as well as on tests such as the TOEIC.

Try presenting the word family chart below to your intermediate- to advanced‑ level learners, and then see if they can complete the following practice exercise. Subscribers can access a printable pdf of the chart and exercise here: Advanced Word Families. See our Parts of Speech lesson for lower‑level practice.

Verb Noun Adjective Adverb
act action active actively
apologize apology apologetic apologetically
beautify beauty beautiful beautifully
believe belief believable believably
benefit benefit beneficial beneficially
care care careful carefully
create creation creative creatively
decide decision decisive decisively
differ difference different differently
divide division divisive divisively
exclude exclusion exclusive exclusively
identify identification identifiable identifiably
justify justification justifiable justifiably
protect protection protective protectively
rely reliability reliable reliably
signify significance significant significantly
succeed success successful successfully
tolerate tolerance tolerable tolerably
understand understanding understandable understandably

Practice

Have students complete the sentences below with a form of the prompt word. Allow them to refer to the chart above. You may also want to have students identify the parts of speech. Note that they may have to change the word form by making a noun plural or conjugating a verb into the correct tense.

Example

# Prompt Sentence
Ex protect Female bears are very protective (adjective) of their young.

Questions

# Prompt Sentence
1 succeed Practice and patience are the keys to ______ .
2 rely My best friend has never let me down. I ______ on her many times in the past.
3 differ I can’t see what’s ______ in the second version of this document.
4 act ______ speak louder than words.
5 apologize After tripping me on my way to my desk yesterday, my coworker ______ profusely.
6 identify Please show me your ______ and your insurance papers.
7 understand He was ______ upset when he heard about the accident.
8 divide There were so many ______ issues that they called a mediator in.
9 decide

Word Families: Quick Reference for Teachers

Word Families are sometimes referred to as groups, chunks or rimes. A word family has something in common with each other, have it be the prefix, suffix or root word. For example, green, grass, grow all have the “gr” sound in the beginning of the word.

Word families are important because they help young children recognize and analyze word patterns when they are learning to read. When teaching analytic phonics, teachers use word families to help children understand these patterns and that certain words have the same letter combinations and sounds.

According to researchers Wylie and Durrel, there are 37 common word families: ack, ain, ake, ale, all, ame, an, ank, ap, ash, at, ate, aw, ay, eat, ell, est, ice, ick, ide, ight, ill, in, ine, ing, ink, ip, it, ock, oke, op, ore, ot, uck ,ug, ump, unk.

  • ack: back, hack, pack, rack
  • ain: brain, chain, main, plain
  • ake: awake, bake, cake, fake
  • ale: ale, bale, sale, tale
  • all: all, ball, call, hall
  • ame: blame, came, game, same
  • an: an, ban, can, pan
  • ank: bank, drank, sank, tank
  • ap: cap, map, rap, tap
  • ash: bash, dash, rash, sash
  • at: bat, cat, fat, mat
  • ate: fate, gate, late, rate
  • aw: claw, draw, paw, saw
  • ay: day, hay, may, say
  • eat: beat, feat, meat, seat
  • ell: bell, fell, tell, well
  • est: best, rest, vest, west
  • ice: dice, mice, nice, rice
  • ick: brick, kick, pick, sick
  • ide: bride, hide, ride, side
  • ight: bright, fight, light, night
  • ill: bill, hill, pill, still
  • in: bin, chin, grin, tin
  • ine: dine, fine, mine, vine
  • ing: bring, king, sing, wing
  • ink: drink, link, pink, sink
  • ip: chip, dip, lip, sip
  • it: bit, fit, hit, sit
  • ock: block, clock, rock, sock
  • op: cop, hop, mop, top
  • ore: bore, more, sore, tore
  • ot: got, hot, not, rot
  • uck: buck, duck luck, tuck
  • ug: bug, hug, mug, rug
  • ump: bump, dump, jump, pump
  • unk: bunk, dunk, junk,sunk

Source: Richard E. Wylie and Donald D. Durrell, 1970. “Teaching Vowels Through Phonograms.” Elementary English 47, 787-791.

Word Family Framework

It shows how words within the same family are placed at different levels and is aimed at teachers who can use it to plan courses, syllabi and lessons. The WFF is the product of an ELT research award and was designed by Richard West.

What is the Word Family Framework (WFF)?

The WFF is a searchable resource for teachers and learners of English that consists of over 22,000 vocabulary items arranged according to six levels aligned to the Common European Framework of Reference.

Start using the Word Family Framework

  • What can the WFF be used for?
  • The WFF can be used by institutions, teachers and learners to construct target vocabularies for individual learning, syllabus and lesson planning, materials design and exam preparation. It can be used for two different types of vocabulary selection:
  • ‘Vertical searches’
  • Identifying all the vocabulary items at one CEFR level.
  • Identifying all the vocabulary items at several CEFR levels.

‘Horizontal searches’

  • Identifying the CEFR level of an individual word or group of words.
  • Identifying the CEFR levels of all the members of a word family in order to decide which items may be worth learning.
  • Identifying unknown members of word families in order to extend a learner’s vocabulary.

How can the WFF be searched?

The WFF can be searched in three main ways:

1. For horizontal searches to look for a particular word or item, type the term you are looking for in the search box.

2. For vertical searches to find all the items at one or more CEFR levels, tick () all the CEFR levels you want.

3. To download the complete WFF, click the Download box.

How does the WFF link to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR)?

The CEFR includes statements about the vocabulary range of a learner at each of six levels, A1 to C2.

 The CEFR’s descriptors make quantitative statements about the learner’s vocabulary repertoire at each level, but stop short of stating how large this repertoire might be at each level, or which vocabulary items would be appropriate for each level. However, the CEFR invites users of the Framework to `consider and where appropriate state:

  • which lexical elements (fixed expressions and single word forms) the learner will need/be equipped/be required to recognise and/or use;
  • how they are selected and ordered.’
See also:  Why do we ‘drive home’ but ‘drive to work’?

It is just this selection and ordering of lexical elements that the WFF offers to users.

How large is the WFF?

The WFF includes more than 22,000 words and vocabulary items. It starts with a list of some 6000 of the most common and useful headwords, arranged alphabetically for easy access.

Most headwords provide the starting point for a word family, which includes the cognates, derivatives and compounds which make up the family.

All family members are then presented across a number of levels, so that the relative value of each item may be quickly determined. 

How were the words in the WFF chosen?

The vocabulary items presented in the WFF have been chosen from a survey of a large number of published sources and word lists produced in the UK, USA, Germany, Europe and China.

These lists vary in size and function, and the items in the lists were selected according to differing criteria.

The research that preceded the development of the WFF therefore began by surveying these lists in detail to identify the levels of agreement between these different sources. In this way, the WFF presents a consensus of views about the level of each vocabulary item.

How does the WFF differ from dictionaries and word lists?

Traditionally, dictionaries and word lists present lexical items in alphabetical order. The WFF, however, presents words in word families. Each family may include items that depart from strict alphabetical order.

So, for example, the family value includes words such as devalue, evaluate and invaluable, which would be widely separated from value, valuable and valueless in a conventional dictionary or list.

They are presented together here because it is widely believed that seeing words as members of a family rather than in isolation promotes effective vocabulary learning:

What is column X and how do I use it?

As can be seen here, in addition to the six levels aligned to the CEFR, the WFF includes a column X. This column includes extra members of word families which are either a) off the A1–C2 scale, or b) not included in the main scale because there is insufficient information in the research data. It presents items of various kinds:

Learners and teachers may select from column X the items which they find useful and easy to learn or teach. In this way, the WFF allows users not only to select vocabulary at a particular level (vertical searching), but also to look across levels at items within the same family (horizontal searching).

What does the WFF not include?

The WFF includes a wide range of over 22,000 items of English vocabulary. It covers both British and American English, with variant spellings (honour/honor) and variant terms (lift/elevator).

However, it is a framework of general English and so it does not include vocabulary items from academic, business, scientific or technical English.

Neither does it include dialect or obsolete words found outside the common core of British or American English.

Can I adapt the WFF to my own context?

It is recognized that the WFF may not be fully appropriate for all learners or all learning situations.

For this reason, the WFF will incorporate an interactive dimension, and users are invited to discuss their views and the ways they use the WFF with the British Council and other users in the WFF discussion forum (click for access).

Our intention is that this discussion will lead to the introduction of a facility which will enable users to download and adapt the WWF to their particular local contexts.

Word Family Units

Word Family Unit: -ack Words

Print a matching game, a reading slider, a word wheel, flashcards, and a mini-book to help students learn to read words in the -ack word family. Words include: pack, back, rack, jack, snack, and black.

Word Family Unit: -ad Words

This week's word family unit contains words that end in -ad. Print out a word wheel, flashcards, a match game, and more! Words: pad, glad, sad, bad, dad, mad, and had.

Word Family Unit: -ag Words

This unit is centered on words that end in -ag. Try out the reading slider, flashcards, and other worksheets. Includes: snag, bag, wag, nag, tag, sag, and rag.

Word Family Unit: -ail Words

This unit is packed with printable activities for words that end in -ail. Includes a trace and write worksheet, matching game, mini-book, and more! Mail, snail, nail, tail, sail, trail, fail, and pail.

Word Family Unit: -ain Words

This week's word family unit features words that end with -ain. Print out a word wheel, tracing worksheets, and flashcards. Words include: train, drain, rain, gain, chain, brain, main, and pain.

Word Family Unit: -ake Words

Download and print a matching game, flashcards, a word-slider, and more in this week's word family unit focusing on words that end in -ake.

Word Family Unit: -all Words

Words that end with -all are the focus for this word family unit. This unit includes printable tracing worksheets, flashcards, and a word slider.

Word Family Unit: -am Words

This unit includes the words ham, jam, Sam, clam, slam, yam, ram, and swam. You'll find a printable word wheel, letter slider, flashcards, and worksheets.

Word Family Unit: -an Words

The -an word family includes the words man, pan, ran, than, van, can, plan, and fan.

Word Family Unit: -and Words

Download and print a matching game, flashcards, a word-slider, and more in this week's word family unit focusing on words that end in -and.

Word Family Unit: -ap Words

The -ap word family unit features words that end in -ap. Try the flashcards, matching game, word wheel, and more! Map, tap, gap, nap, trap, lap, cap, and snap.

Word Family Unit: -at Words

Download and print a word slider, flash cards, and other worksheets featuring words that end in -at. Words include: hat, sat, bat, flat, that, mat, cat, and rat.

Word Family Unit: -ate Words

This week's word family unit features words that end in -ate. Print out a word wheel, tracing worksheets, and flashcards. Words: date, state, rate, skate, late, gate, mate, and plate.

Word Family Unit: -aw Words

This unit is centered on words that end with -aw. Try out the reading slider, flashcards, and other worksheets. Includes: jaw, claw, law, straw, saw, raw, draw, and paw.

Word Family Unit: -ay Words

The -ay word family unit includes the words: may, clay, way, pay, jay, bay, and say. You'll find a printable word wheel, letter slider, flashcards, and worksheets.

Word Family Unit: -eal Words

The -eal family of words contains the words: teal, deal, meal, seal, real, steal, and heal. Print out a word wheel, word slider, tracing worksheets, and more!

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*