Lasagna, casserole, and other food names from pots and pans

Homemade Lasagna is a classic that every cook should have in their rotation. Tender sheets of pasta, a cheese filling, and a rich meaty tomato sauce make the perfect dish!

While there are a few steps to this recipe, it’s easy to make and has huge flavor. This dish can be made ahead of time and freezes well either before or after baking!

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and Pans

How to Make Lasagna

Homemade lasagna may have a few steps, but each step is easy – and I assure you it’s worth the time; the perfect Italian meal!

The ingredients in this recipe are all things you know and it’s not difficult at all! All you’ll need for this easy lasagna recipe is one pan, one bowl, and a 9×13 baking dish!

A quick overview of the layers:

  • Cheese Filling Mix the ricotta and cheeses (per recipe below) with an egg in a bowl, and set aside. No ricotta? No problem, cottage cheese works just fine in this recipe!
  • Meat Sauce Brown the onion, garlic, and meat in a pot on the stovetop. Add the pasta sauce and tomato paste & simmer a few minutes.
  • Layer Together Layer the meat sauce and cheese mixture with noodles and bake until bubbling

SPINACH LASAGNA To make a spinach lasagna, squeeze out most of the moisture of defrosted frozen spinach and add it along with the cheese layer. Lasagna ingredients don’t have to be limited to the ones you see here.

Substitute meats or different cheeses, or try different meat sauce variations.

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and Pans

How to Layer Lasagna

Once you have prepared the meat sauce and cheeses, you’re ready to layer. This is the order of layers:

  • sauce – noodles – cheese
  • sauce – noodles – cheese
  • noodles – (bake) – cheese
  1. Spread about a cup of meat sauce into a 9×13 pan. Add a layer of noodles.
  2. Top the noodles with some of the cheese mixture.
  3. Repeat the layers, ending with a layer of noodles
  4. Cover with foil and bake.
  5. Remove foil, top with mozzarella and parmesan and bake another 15 minutes.

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and Pans

How Long to Bake

Baking time lasagna for this recipe is about one hour total. To get that perfect browned cheese topping, you’ll need to bake it in two stages.

  1. Layer, cover it tightly in foil to retain the moisture.
  2. Once cooked, remove the foil, top with cheese, and return to the oven for another 15 minutes, or until the top is browned and your easy lasagna is bubbling.

Important Tip: Let the lasagna sit/rest for at least 15 minutes once removed from the oven (even 30-45 minutes is fine). This will keep it from becoming runny and help it to keep its shape when cut.

Resting is not required when reheating.

Serve this easy lasagna with a chunk of Homemade Garlic Bread.

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and Pans

We love serving a classic lasagna dinner, complete with a caesar salad or Italian salad and dinner rolls slathered in Homemade Garlic Butter. It’s the world’s best meal!

Make Ahead

Lasagna can be prepared ahead of time and refrigerated up to 2 days before baking. It can also be frozen before or after baking.

To Freeze

Lasagna is one of the best meals to make ahead and freeze. Double or triple the recipe and freeze some for another day. Defrost in the refrigerator overnight and bake as directed.

See also:  Where we get the words uppercase and lowercase

To Reheat Lasagna

If you’ve frozen leftovers, pop them in the oven at 350°F covered, until reheated. This should take about 30 minutes! Of course, leftovers are perfectly heated in the microwave too!

More Italian Favorites

Did you enjoy this Homemade Lasagna? Be sure to leave a rating and a comment below!

Homemade lasagna is a classic, delicious dinner that every family should have in their recipe rotation. 

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and Pans

  • Heat oven to 350°F. Cook pasta al dente according to package directions. Rinse under cold water and set aside.
  • Brown beef, sausage, onion and garlic over medium high heat until no pink remains. Drain any fat.
  • Stir in pasta sauce, tomato paste, Italian seasoning. Simmer 5 minutes.
  • Combine 1-1/2 cups mozzarella, ricotta, 1/4 cup parmesan cheese, parsley and egg.
  • Add 1 cup meat sauce to a 9×13 pan. Top with 3 lasagna noodles. Layer with 1/3 of the cheese mixture and 1 cup of meat sauce. Repeat finishing with noodles topped with sauce.
  • Cover with foil and bake 45 minutes. Uncover, add cheese and bake an additional 15 minutes or until browned and bubbly. Broil 2-3 minutes if desired.
  • Rest 10-15 minutes before cutting.

Time Saving Tip:  Use fresh lasagna sheets found in the deli area and skip the boiling step! Fresh lasagna doesn't need to be boiled first.
Let the lasagna sit/rest for at least 15 minutes once removed from the oven (even 30-45 minutes is fine). This will keep it from becoming runny and help it to keep its shape when cut.
Resting is not required when reheating.
Substitutions:
Ricotta cheese can be replaced with cottage cheese.
Use all beef (or even ground turkey) in place of sausage if needed. Calories: 377, Carbohydrates: 28g, Protein: 29g, Fat: 16g, Saturated Fat: 7g, Cholesterol: 71mg, Sodium: 857mg, Potassium: 492mg, Fiber: 2g, Sugar: 4g, Vitamin A: 805IU, Vitamin C: 7.4mg, Calcium: 526mg, Iron: 2.2mg © SpendWithPennies.com. Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any social media is strictly prohibited. Please view my photo use policy here.

150 Freezer Meals You Can Make in Advance

Home Recipe Collections

View as slideshow

Chock-full of poultry, potatoes, peas and corn, this recipe for easy chicken pot pie makes two golden pies, so you can serve one at supper and save the other in the freezer for a busy night. This is the best chicken potpie recipe to have on hand when company comes over.

—Karen Johnson, Bakersfield, California. Freezer Meal Prep Tip: For the best results, freeze unbaked chicken potpies. That way, the pies will be able to cook through without burning the crust. Check out these smart freezer tips from savvy home cooks.

Get Recipe

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and PansTaste of Home Growing up, this was the meal I always wanted on my birthday. Mother made the sauce from scratch, but I use store-bought spaghetti sauce to save time. Replace the ground beef with Italian sausage if you want more spice. —Deb Morrison, Skiatook, Oklahoma

See also:  What causes lightning bolts?

Get Recipe

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and PansTaste of Home Enjoy a steak dinner in a bowl with this super simple, hearty steak soup. Because of the chili powder and cayenne pepper, it packs a little heat, but the recipe can easily be adjusted if you’re cooking for young ones. —Erica Schmidt, Kansas City, Kansas. Freezer Meal Prep Tip: To keep your food safe, defrost your meals in the refrigerator overnight, rather than defrosting it on a kitchen counter. Keep your freezer in tip-top shape with this easy freezer organization hack.

Get Recipe

Lasagna, Casserole, and other Food Names from Pots and PansTaste of Home I grow zucchini by the bushel, so this pizza casserole is one of my dinnertime go-to's. My hungry husband and kids gobble it right up. —Lynn Bernstetter, White Bear Lake, Minnesota

Get Recipe

Lasagne

Dish in Italian cuisine
“Lasagna” redirects here. For other uses, see Lasagna (disambiguation).
LasagneBaked meat lasagneTypePastaCoursePrimo or mainPlace of originItalyRegion or stateCampania, Emilia-Romagna, MarcheServing temperatureHotMain ingredientsDurum wheatVariationsLasagnette

  • Cookbook: Lasagne
  •   Media: Lasagne

Lasagne (US: /ləˈzɑːnjə/, UK: /ləˈzænjə/, Italian: [laˈzaɲɲe]; singular lasagna, Italian: [laˈzaɲɲa]) are a type of wide, flat pasta, possibly one of the oldest types of pasta.[1]

Lasagne, or the singular lasagna, is also an Italian dish made of stacked layers of this flat pasta alternating with fillings such as ragù (ground meats and tomato sauce) and other vegetables, cheese (which may include ricotta and parmesan), and seasonings and spices such as garlic, oregano and basil.[2] The dish may be topped with melted grated mozzarella cheese. Typically, the cooked pasta is assembled with the other ingredients and then baked in an oven. The resulting lasagne casserole is cut into single-serving square portions.

Origins and history

Lasagne originated in Italy during the Middle Ages and have traditionally been ascribed to the city of Naples. The first recorded recipe was set down in the early 14th-century Liber de Coquina (The Book of Cookery).

[3] It bore only a slight resemblance to the later traditional form of lasagne, featuring a fermented dough flattened into thin sheets (lasagne), boiled, sprinkled with cheese and spices, and then eaten with a small pointed stick.

[4] Recipes written in the century following the Liber de Coquina recommended boiling the pasta in chicken broth and dressing it with cheese and chicken fat. In a recipe adapted for the Lenten fast, walnuts were recommended.[4]

The traditional lasagne of Naples, lasagne di carnevale, are layered with local sausage, small fried meatballs, hard-boiled eggs, ricotta and mozzarella cheeses, and sauced with a Neapolitan ragù, a meat sauce.

[5] Lasagne al forno, layered with a thicker ragù and Béchamel sauce, and corresponding to the most common version of the dish outside Italy, are traditionally associated with the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. In other regions, lasagne can be made with various combinations of ricotta or mozzarella cheese, tomato sauce, meats (e.g., ground beef, pork or chicken), and vegetables (e.g.

, spinach, zucchini, olives, mushrooms), and the dish is typically flavoured with wine, garlic, onion, and oregano. In all cases, the lasagne are oven-baked (al forno).

See also:  D-day: the utah beach landings

Traditionally, pasta dough prepared in Southern Italy used semolina and water; in the northern regions, where semolina was not available, flour and eggs were used. In modern Italy, since the only type of wheat allowed for commercially sold pasta is durum wheat, commercial lasagne are made of semolina from durum wheat.[6]

In the northern Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, and especially in its capital, Bologna, layers of lasagne are traditionally green (the color is obtained by mixing spinach or other vegetables in the dough) and served with ragù (a thick sauce made from onions, carrots, celery, finely ground pork and beef, butter, and tomatoes),[7][8] bechamel and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.

Etymology

In Ancient Rome, there was a dish similar to a traditional lasagne called lasana or lasanum (Latin for 'container' or 'pot') described in the book De re coquinaria by Marcus Gavius Apicius,[9] but the word could have a more ancient origin. The first theory is that lasagne comes from Greek λάγανον (laganon), a flat sheet of pasta dough cut into strips.[10][11][12][13] The word λαγάνα (lagana) is still used in Greek to mean a flat thin type of unleavened bread baked for the holiday Clean Monday.

Another theory is that the word lasagne comes from the Greek λάσανα (lasana) or λάσανον (lasanon) meaning 'trivet', 'stand for a pot' or 'chamber pot'.

[14][15][16] The Romans borrowed the word as lasanum, meaning 'cooking pot'.[17] The Italians used the word to refer to the cookware in which lasagne is made.

Later, the food took on the name of the serving dish.

Another proposed link, or reference, is the 14th-century English dish loseyn[18] as described in The Forme of Cury, a cookbook prepared by “the chief Master Cooks of King Richard II”,[19] which included English recipes as well as dishes influenced by Spanish, French, Italian, and Arab cuisines.[20] This dish has similarities to modern lasagne in both its recipe, which features a layering of ingredients between pasta sheets, and its name. An important difference is the lack of tomatoes, which did not arrive in Europe until after Columbus reached America in 1492. The earliest discussion of the tomato in European literature appeared in a herbal written in 1544 by Pietro Andrea Mattioli,[21] while the earliest cookbook found with tomato recipes was published in Naples in 1692, but the author had apparently obtained these recipes from Spanish sources.[21]

As with most other types of pasta, the Italian word is a plural form: lasagne meaning more than one sheet of lasagna, though in many other languages a derivative of the singular word lasagna is used for the popular baked pasta dish.

Regional usage in Italy, when referring to the baked dish, favours the plural form lasagne in the north of the country and the singular lasagna in the south.

[22] The former, plural usage has influenced the usual spelling found in British English, while the southern Italian, singular usage has influenced the spelling often used in American English.[22]

In popular culture

The comic strip Garfield's titular cat character enjoys the consumption of lasagna.[23]

Gallery

  • Lasagne sheets before cooking

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*